Advertising And Celebrity

It used to be taboo for movie stars to do advertising for products in the United States. We never used to see our favorite movie star in commercials for Frosted Flakes. Catherine Zeta Jones recently broke this unspoken rule by appearing in a series of T-Mobile advertisements. While it is anyone’s prerogative on how they want to make money, I can understand why movie stars try to avoid getting involved in advertising for products or services. Charity advertising is one thing. Many movie stars do commercials and public service announcements for charities. However, hawking products for Madison Avenue might not be a good idea for movie stars. It can be difficult to play a serious cop role in your newest movie when you are known as the peanut butter guy from television. In short, movie stars and advertising just do not mix.

Occasionally, a celebrity’s success with selling products does depend on the product. George Foreman is now just as well known for his grills as he is as a boxer. I guess the question is did the grill make Foreman successful or did Foreman make the grill successful? George Foreman was a boxer professionally but he had done a series of advertising for muffler shops and other products prior to the grill. Perhaps George was so likeable that the combination of a likeable celebrity and a product everyone wants is like gold. This seems the most logical explanation for Foreman’s success. What about other celebrities?

Why Does It Work When It Works?

Public Image is important in advertising. If public image was not important, then McDonalds would not have cancelled their contract with Kobe Bryant after Kobe was indicted on rape charges. Although he was never convicted, he still lost all endorsement deals with McDonalds and other companies. So there is an important question: are we buying the product, or the celebrity? There is a simple answer. Regardless of the pitching by the celebrities, substandard products only survive for a short time. Failed television shows are a good example of this theory. Jeff Foxworthy is one of the most successful stand-up comedians in history, and he is a well liked celebrity. However, his television sitcom The Jeff Foxworthy Show failed terribly. Foxworthy was not negatively affected by the failure of his sitcom because he went on to start the very successful variety show Blue Collar TV. But as you can see, advertising is a two way street. The celebrity needs to have some credibility in the eyes of the sponsor and the customers. Also, more importantly, product needs to be of high quality as well.

On of the better examples of celebrities in advertising used strictly to sway consumer choice is the war between the cola giants. Pepsi has a reputation of trying to target the younger demographics by featuring such celebrities as Michael Jackson and Madonna while Coca Cola has featured such celebrities as Michael Jordan and Elton John. Pepsi wanted their reputation as the coolest new thing while Coke went with the wholesome family approach. To this point, research has shown that Pepsi usually come up tops in the cola wars. However, as long as there are celebrities to hire there will always be celebrities in advertising.

Is Satellite Radio Advertising Better Than FM Radio Advertising?

Is pizza better than a taco?

I would have this argument with my cousins on a weekly basis as a kid. After church our families would always take the kids out for lunch. It was often up to the kids to decide where we went. It was lord of the flies on a less lethal scale, but it was a battle every week. Every week we had to make a choice, and often times had to convince the less vocal cousins why a sausage and mushroom pie was much better than ground beef in a corn shell.

Years later, many cities actually have combo pizza and taco chains under one roof. How on earth will kids learn to argue options when everything is right in front of them?

How do you argue a pizza against a taco though? Both are so different. Both have clear positive qualities, but neither is of the same food family. At the end of the day, you can’t (unless you are 8 years old) argue the topic with any sort of true passion or understanding.

Its not exactly a direct comparison, is it? Is an orange better than an apple? Again… very different fruits offering very different flavors to the consumer of each. Both are pleasing, but both very different. The same can be said about satellite radio advertising and traditional FM radio advertising. Both can offer positive results to those who use them correctly, but both are very different.

For starters, satellite radio advertising will reach the entire nation. If a business is only interested in reaching a select portion of the country or one city alone, the medium wouldn’t exactly make the most sense to use as a majority of the listeners would be spread out across the nation, not in one set area.

However, if the business wants to reach a national audience and does not have the budget of a major corporation such as “Pepsi”, satellite radio advertising can offer some very attractive and affordable options that a syndicated radio show on AM or FM radio could not compete with in terms of price on a national scale.

Each have pros and cons, and each have a unique way of reaching an audience. Understanding what each does in terms of reaching a target audience is key to making an informed decision when it comes to radio advertising goals. Information is the key to success.

What is Brand Advertising?

Brand advertising is at the heart of any businesses success. It’s all too easy as a business owner to make the mistake of thinking of your brand as a logo and a color scheme along with a slogan. To the consumer (Remember them? they’re the people who keep you in business), your brand is synonymous with your company. People build a relationship which can be very personal to your brand, not your company per se. The best brands build an emotional connection with consumers, leading to customer loyalty.

Successful brand advertising is all about building this connection with the consumer, most importantly establishing your business or your product as something which is a known quantity to them – something comforting which they can trust. You already know how great your product or service is; but that alone won’t guarantee your success. You need to raise the profile of your brand in order to get the attention of consumers and begin building a relationship with them based on trust.

While some media lend themselves more readily to brand advertising than others, a comprehensive campaign of branding or re-branding will typically be done across several different media. Print and television are usually the media of choice for brand advertising, including ads in publications, billboard and other advertising as well as ‘captive audience’ formats such as adverts on subways and buses.

Television is also a visual medium and as such it can make a powerful brand impact on consumers when used effectively but regardless of the media chosen, simplicity is the best way to advertise your brand. A combination of print and television media brand advertising is generally a good media mix for a brand advertising campaign. Your other marketing efforts can build on your branding later, but when you need to establish a presence for your brand, keep it simple for the biggest impact.

Radio spots and online advertising can also add to your brand advertising campaign; while they usually are not a suitable substitute for the more traditional print and television placements, they can be a valuable part of your branding efforts. Online advertising in particular is growing in popularity, with a growing number of businesses choosing to go where consumers are ‘ which is online in many cases. Online brand advertising incorporating banner ads, blogs and even video are becoming more common and they seem to be having an effect on the consumer; meaning that these online brand advertising venues are to be ignored at your peril as a business.